• A stranded motorcyclist is aided through the night by the kindness of the road – and then passes it forward.

      The Kindness of the Road
    • A creative way to lay off an employee helps a young man create a lucrative career.

      The Best Boss
    • Watching his daughter care for some children in need gives a father a deep respect for his daughter.

      Way Beyond Babysitting
    • A simple act of kindness in Barcelona gives an American student a lifetime of grateful memories.

      Conquering Fear in Barcelona
    • Beth looked down into the water and saw something that would haunt her forever…

      Whoever Owns That Face
    • A kind word teaches that avoiding fears does not make the problem go away.

      Freedom From Fear
    • At a busy intersection a blind man drifts into the street and is rescued by an unlikely hero.

      Blind Justice
    • A group of boys show what it’s like to be a good gang, and stick up for a friend in need.

      The Good Scout
    • There is nothing like not having to go through it all alone.

      It Was “Our” Disease
    • By chance the right plumbing supplies show up on mountain road to save a stranded couple.

      Aid in the Mountains
    • A teacher finds a way to help an impoverished divorced family with some extra food.

      The Incompetent Boxboy
    • Integrity after an injury inspires a lawyer to make the right choice in a settlement.

      I’ll Take Half
    • A friendly word in your own language can sometimes make all the difference.

      Someone From Home
    • A young girl’s testimony shows the true meaning of courage.

      Testifying
    • A son’s courageous words brings peace to his dying mother.

      The Courage to Tell the Truth
    • Memories from childhood inspire a lifetime of of reaching out to those in need.

      Angel in the Playground
    • A young man helps a friend and ends up with his own college education.

      Dreams Sometimes Come True
    • A young woman trusts a gentleman at the airport and is able to visit her dying mother.

      The Gentleman at the Airport
    • A group of caring travelers turn an act of rudeness into a heartwarming experience.

      Stranded
    • … in which a physician’s assistant goes above and beyond the call of duty.

      Julie’s Dogs

HeroicStories’ mission is to use the power of the Internet and existing media to bring diverse, international voices to the world to explore the idea that people are good, that individuals and individual action matter, and that regularly showing examples of people being good to each other will inspire similar actions in others.

Begun in 1999, HeroicStories brings diverse, international voices to the world – reminding us that people are good, that individuals and individual action matter. We’ve published over 800 stories like the following:

  • Klansmen burn a cross in the yard of a Mississippi civil rights worker. She scares them off… then brings her children out to toast marshmallows over the burning cross.
  • A construction worker laments his painful winter-cracked hands until he sees a man delivering newspaper bundles… a man with no hands.
  • A retiree spends his time assisting grade-schoolers. Not until his memorial service did his family learn of the magnitude of the difference he made in the lives of others.
  • A grandmother remembers her childhood Christmas Eve in a home with no heat. On Christmas morning she found a tree, gifts for all the kids… even heat.
  • A driver’s headlights quit on the highway at night. Another driver slows, turns on his brights, lights her way for over an hour to her exit… then turns around to drive back to his original destination

Our mission is to publish examples of people being good to each other, to inspire similar heroic actions in others.

It’s easy to receive HeroicStories: they’re free, delivered directly to you by email twice a week. Just subscribe using the form on any page of this site. (We guarantee your privacy; we never share your address.)

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed it’s the only thing that ever has.
– Margaret Mead (1901-1978), American Anthropologist